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Thread: Supporting Tabletop RPGS: Features You Might Not Have Considered

  1. #1

    Supporting Tabletop RPGS: Features You Might Not Have Considered

    I bought Tabletop Simulator recently because I wanted to look at it and see if, in the future, it might be a suitable medium for me and my friends to play tabletop RPGs on. I really like what's already there, including the non-TTRPG things. The controls feel good once you understand them, the interface is simple, and objects in the game have a nice physicality to them. I haven't been able to find a devlog that lists planned changes, but I have seen some people talking about basic planned features, such as character sheets, so I'm not even going to mention those. I wanted to bring up some simple features that the devs may not have considered that would make playing TTRPGs (and likely other more classical boardgames too) a more enjoyable experience.

    • An infinite 'table': Simple enough, a 'table' that does not have borders, or extends so far that it would be impractical to fill it with game pieces.
    • A way for the host to change the where the camera resets to, so that when other players hit the space bar the camera changes to a view they've chosen.
    • The ability to group and save objects locally: Players should be able to select multiple objects they've placed and 'group' them, thereby locking them into position relative to one another. Players should also be able to save said groups and spawn more of them. This would greatly aid in things such as creating layouts or even custom decks. Once saved, they should be saved between sessions, allowing you to design things in single-player mode and import them into multiplayer mode easily.
    • 'Blank' Cards: Cards that are blank (or have a template with fill-able forms) that you can type onto during play. Ideally you should also be able to save such cards as custom objects, and be able to lock them to prevent other players editing them.
    • The ability to name objects: Players should be able to select a piece and name it, so that other players can see that name. This could either take the form of text floating above the object, or text appearing when hovering over the object, or the names appearing when you press a certain key.


    With these few things I think many games will become much easier to play using Tabletop Simulator

    Edit: Forgot one.

    • Revealing secret objects: The host, or a player with appropriate permissions, should be able to place objects other players cannot see and then later reveal them. This way you could construct a dungeon, and reveal it only as the game progresses without needing to take the time to lay out new pieces.

  2. #2

    Supporting Tabletop RPGS: Features You Might Not Have Considered

    ExplosiveRunes said

    • The ability to name objects: Players should be able to select a piece and name it, so that other players can see that name. This could either take the form of text floating above the object, or text appearing when hovering over the object, or the names appearing when you press a certain key.


    +1 to this idea. That could be really useful, especially with the RPG pieces. You could easily distinguish between multiple pieces of the same type, or even use that to show a health counter for any given piece.

  3. #3

    Supporting Tabletop RPGS: Features You Might Not Have Considered

    ExplosiveRunes said
    • An infinite 'table': Simple enough, a 'table' that does not have borders, or extends so far that it would be impractical to fill it with game pieces.


    This is semi-possible already; by doing a save edit and using something like the GO boards used in Pants' screenshot here.



    Aside from that, those are some really good suggestions and I'd like to see them (especially the hidden dungeon).

  4. #4

    Supporting Tabletop RPGS: Features You Might Not Have Considered

    ExplosiveRunes said
    [*]A way for the host to change the where the camera resets to, so that when other players hit the space bar the camera changes to a view they've chosen.
    [*]The ability to name objects: Players should be able to select a piece and name it, so that other players can see that name. This could either take the form of text floating above the object, or text appearing when hovering over the object, or the names appearing when you press a certain key.
    [*]Revealing secret objects: The host, or a player with appropriate permissions, should be able to place objects other players cannot see and then later reveal them. This way you could construct a dungeon, and reveal it only as the game progresses without needing to take the time to lay out new pieces.[/list]

    These features would offer sooooo much help for sessions, The first would make moments more climatic, we see this alot more recently were we get a focus prompt in FPS to see something happening around us that we werent normally looking at, the second would allow us to set up teams or foes that use the same piece but to define them different lets say you hit one of the rat named bob but there are two rats on the table "OMG WHICH IS BOB!" lol the last suggestion would be be good to allow for normal progression of an rpg game and GM/DM hate it when they have to sacrifice ease of use over immersion, this shouldnt be a DOTA/LoL game were you can see the whole map.

  5. #5

    Supporting Tabletop RPGS: Features You Might Not Have Considered

    The ability to name objects would be a great help for me an my players.

  6. #6

    Supporting Tabletop RPGS: Features You Might Not Have Considered

    I hadn't considered grouping at all. It was a very valuable feature in Roll20, though.
    I would vote against infinite maps, though. Partially because it would encourage large maps, which without some sort of clever culling, Unity simply can't handle. Perhaps a 'panning' or 'scrolling' table, where the table is broken into a grid of saves, and you can 'pan' between them (effectively being like you were quickly loading and saving maps, but as one fluid motion).

    Naming tokens (players/monsters) is a must. It can handle things such as health and whatnot until we perhaps get a more sophisticated solution.

  7. #7

    Supporting Tabletop RPGS: Features You Might Not Have Considered

    Also something regarding the figurines: customising the color of the token/figs to show some differences. Having a simple set of RGB will be completly enough I guess.

  8. #8

    Supporting Tabletop RPGS: Features You Might Not Have Considered

    I would really like to see an ability to disable 'horizontal physics' (I partially made that up). When I'm playing an RPG, I really don't need pieces to be able to fall over, or fly into other pieces knocking them over. And once we get the ability to add custom models/pieces, I could see some pieces getting 'top heavy' and difficult to place. It would be nice if we could set either the current scene, or maybe individual elements, to only obey vertical physics (placing, stacking, etc.).

  9. #9

    Supporting Tabletop RPGS: Features You Might Not Have Considered

    An infinite table is a bit rash: Tabletop Sim seems focused on getting the feeling of being at an actual table playing with friends, and there are more practical online rpg systems if I wanted useful tools to play with (such as roll 20).

    That being said the physics engine coupled with the unstable dungeon walls do seem a bit finicky to play games with.

    IMO an easy to write on/erase white board, and a ruler to measure distance would work great as both RPG implements and Props.

  10. #10

    Supporting Tabletop RPGS: Features You Might Not Have Considered

    DjKitKat said
    An infinite table is a bit rash: Tabletop Sim seems focused on getting the feeling of being at an actual table playing with friends, and there are more practical online rpg systems if I wanted useful tools to play with (such as roll 20).

    That being said the physics engine coupled with the unstable dungeon walls do seem a bit finicky to play games with.

    I probably should have said "very large" table, I didn't quite realize the limits of unity, a table that was triple the length and width of the custom table would probably suffice especially if they added the ability to have multiple (two or three) concurrent tables in a single session, so you could represent discrete areas. For example, you go ''upstairs'' so the camera physically pans around and you are now looking at a different table.

    Also, in the current build you can already lock the dungeon tiles, en mass, into place. I assume that host-locking objects is to be fully implemented because of this and did not bring it up. I only wanted to bring up ideas that the devs may have actually not considered at all instead of ones that they've probably already considered and I just want.

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